Astrology, modern and traditional aspects

The words “classical” and “traditional” have an image of difficulty. In fact, my own first impression of traditional astrology was that it was fatalistic, dark, and heavy when I started with it. This article describes the appeal of traditional astrology compared to modern astrology.
Continue reading “Astrology, modern and traditional aspects”

Five things astronomical observation can help astrology

If we keep looking at the sky, we will find things not written in the old astrology books. It may be that ancient astrologers took it for granted to look at the sky and didn’t dare write anything down.
I have chosen five things about color, light, and movement that are easy for everyone to imagine.
Continue reading “Five things astronomical observation can help astrology”

Why are there so few Sun-Mars oppositions?

[日本語]
The frequency of appearance in the Sun-Mars opposition is one-seventh of conjunction. The same result would occur on the collected charts from all over the world. Why? This is not an astrological anomaly, but an astronomical phenomenon.

Astrology from Observation

We understand things by observing facts. It’s no exaggeration to say that everything begins by observing phenomena. The same goes for astrology.
Continue reading “Why are there so few Sun-Mars oppositions?”

Is MC not always the highest place?

I took the picture above when Jupiter, the brightest one in the photo, was approaching to MC. Many astrologers believe MC is the highest place in the ecliptic. Yes, it is. But, not always. Often, the planet appears higher than MC. And it isn’t easy to notice on the horoscope charts because the chart draws 2-dimensional coordinates of the planets. The following are some examples of the images and footage.
Continue reading “Is MC not always the highest place?”

Is “Horoskopos the Observer of Hour” watching the sky?

This short article describes whole sign house system from the skywatcher’s view.

“Horoscope” came from the Greek word “ωροσκόπος, Horoskopos,” which means “observer of the hour,” denoting the ascendant and the 1st house as we know today. This word is originated in ancient Egypt. At that time, the priests observed the eastern and western sky with measuring hour and observing stars. They used to be called “imy-wnw.t”, hour-watcher, astronomer, or one who is in the hour.[1]

"imy-wnw.t" hour-watcher, astronomer, or one who is in the hour."
“imy-wnw.t” hour-watcher, astronomer, or one who is in the hour.”

Continue reading “Is “Horoskopos the Observer of Hour” watching the sky?”

Fear Not Mercury Combust

In Horary astrology, “Combust” of the principal significator often represents the seriously injured and weakness of the subjects. My mentor even occasionally suggests me discarding the chart. In the case of Nativity, receptions and aspects should be taken into account, yet in the simple judgment of combust suggests the malign influence. Then, which celestial bodies have the highest frequency of combustions? It is, of course, Mercury. It has the closest orbit to the Sun and is only 28 degrees away from the Sun at most when observed from Earth. As a result, it has a more extended period of combustion and under the beams than other planets.
Continue reading “Fear Not Mercury Combust”

Observing the Ascendant and MC with a planisphere.

If you have a planisphere, observing the ascendant and MC for a certain time and date is very easy. See the instruction below.

  1. Set the time and date you want.
  2. Find the intersections of the ecliptic ( the yellow line circle below ) and the horizon ( the edge of the oval window ).
    The intersection at the left-hand side is the ascendant, the right-hand side is the descendant.
  3. Set a ruler vertically on the center of the planisphere (the green line on the diagram below).
  4. Find the intersections of the ecliptic and the ruler. The intersection in the oval window is MC, the other side ( covered side ) is IC.

Continue reading “Observing the Ascendant and MC with a planisphere.”